Ugur Aydedim is a Turkish film director and scriptwriter, has short films that are adapted by Julio Cortazar and George Perec’s short stories, along with commercials films and documentaries. The script adapted from novel of Ayhan Gecgin which has same title and of an alienated, individualistic youth disconnected from his Kurdish origins who, due to circumstances beyond his control, is thrown into the center of his people’s tragedy.

Gecgin’s resourceful use of language and fluid style reinforce the sense of inevitability that accompanies the main character’s journey. It can perhaps be said that some of the vivid, detailed descriptions which constitute one of the book’s strengths start seeming a little too dense toward the end, when the events described are already overpowering! But the novel does manage to keep the reader in suspense until the last line. In all, these encounters with the past are a positive development in the quest for a peaceful future. Even though a political compromise on the Kurdish problem is still far from being reached, the works mentioned here have already gone a long way toward breaking many taboos and generating a healthy debate on this issue within Turkey’s political and intellectual circles. Even if people come from different origin, their expectations from life, their worries about life and instincts are similar. The film’s main topic takes us from political issues to universal human being problems and human rights. The main character of the film that called Ali Ihsan is very reserved person. He broke away from his roots and he is somehow isolated from society but an unexpected love and a journey to his hometown changes his life. The film tells us even if people try to understand the life and themselves in a different way but he target that they want to reach is the same.

INDIEGOGO PROJECT PAGE – THE LAST STEP


ELEVEN
Short Film
Director: Uğur Aydedim
Adapted by Julio Cortazar’s short story “Letter to A Young Lady in Paris”


A MAN ASLEEP
Short Film
Director: Uğur Aydedim
Adapted by George Perec’s novel

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